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  • SPAW Advocacy Activity

    Hopefully everyone is gearing up for what will be an energizing and inspiring School Psychology Awareness Week in your districts and schools. This is an important time of the year to advocate for the profession, so please don't forget to make your voices heard to the larger community and to stakeholders next week.

    This may sound like a big challenge for a busy school psychologist, but it is actually quite simple. With the power of social media, you can leverage the support you already have around you, your social media followers. The easiest way for school psychologists to have the largest impact possible on social media during SPAW is through Thunderclap.

    If you've never participated in a Thunderclap, trust me, it is far easier than you probably think. A good analogy for a Thunderclap is an "online flash mob". It allows you and others to share the same message at the same time, spreading an idea across social media platforms that cannot be ignored.

    All it takes it two clicks, and then NASP's Thunderclap message will go out from your social media account(s) on Tuesday, November 15th at 12 p.m. EST without you even having to be at your computer or on your phone. "Set it and forget it" is another good analogy...

    The result? everyone's message will go out at the same time creating much more virtual "noise" to your social media followers. Every person that participates brings hundreds of potential audience members to the table, and if we reach our goal of 250 supporters it is likely we can get #SmallStepsChangeLives and #NASPadvocates trending across social media platforms.

    HOW:
    Step 1: Click this link: https://www.thunderclap.it/projects/49512-school-psych-awareness-week
    Step 2: Click "Support with Facebook", "Support with Twitter", or "Support with Tumbler"- or all three!
    Step 3: Share with co-workers, family, and friends- you do NOT need to be a school psychologist to participate, but you do need to care about kids!

  • SPAW Advocacy Activity

    Hopefully everyone is gearing up for what will be an energizing and inspiring School Psychology Awareness Week in your districts and schools. This is an important time of the year to advocate for the profession, so please don't forget to make your voices heard to the larger community and to stakeholders next week.

    This may sound like a big challenge for a busy school psychologist, but it is actually quite simple. With the power of social media, you can leverage the support you already have around you, your social media followers. The easiest way for school psychologists to have the largest impact possible on social media during SPAW is through Thunderclap.

    If you've never participated in a Thunderclap, trust me, it is far easier than you probably think. A good analogy for a Thunderclap is an "online flash mob". It allows you and others to share the same message at the same time, spreading an idea across social media platforms that cannot be ignored.

    All it takes it two clicks, and then NASP's Thunderclap message will go out from your social media account(s) on Tuesday, November 15th at 12 p.m. EST without you even having to be at your computer or on your phone. "Set it and forget it" is another good analogy...

    The result? everyone's message will go out at the same time creating much more virtual "noise" to your social media followers. Every person that participates brings hundreds of potential audience members to the table, and if we reach our goal of 250 supporters it is likely we can get #SmallStepsChangeLives and #NASPadvocates trending across social media platforms.

    HOW:
    Step 1: Click this link: https://www.thunderclap.it/projects/49512-school-psych-awareness-week
    Step 2: Click "Support with Facebook", "Support with Twitter", or "Support with Tumbler"- or all three!
    Step 3: Share with co-workers, family, and friends- you do NOT need to be a school psychologist to participate, but you do need to care about kids!

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